Open source electronic musical instruments designed in London.
Patches to try
Ingredients:
Radio Music
+
Squarewave oscillator
+
Maths or other AD envelope

Fake timestretch adenvelope AD ENVELOPE OUT radiomusic RESET START RADIO MUSIC OUT adenvelope:e->radiomusic:w audiooutput IN AUDIO OUTPUT oscillator OSCILLATOR SQUARE oscillator:e->radiomusic:w radiomusic:e->audiooutput:w
  1. Use a short sample - one of the drum loops is a good place to start. All samples are divided up into 1024 or fewer slices (start points) - on a long sample, those slices are too large for this trick.
  2. Use the following settings in settings.txt: MUTE=0 | DECLICK=0 | ChanPotImmediate=1 | ChanCVImmediate=0 | StartPotImmediate=0 | StartCVImmediate=0 | StartCVDivider=2 | Looping=1
  3. Set the Start pot to 7 o'clock
  4. Put the squarewave oscillator into Reset so you get fast repeated hits
  5. Connect channel 1 or 4 of a Maths, main output, to Start
  6. Tweak Rise, Fall,output scale and oscillator frequency until you get something cool. Start with output scale at 2 o'clock. Set the shape to LIN. With Rise up and Fall on zero, the file will go forwards. The other way, it will go backwards.
  7. Here's the demo video
  8. Extra Sauce: Everything in the patch is CV controllable - direction, sample speed (oscillator frequency) etc.

Ingredients:
Radio Music
+
Turing Machine
+
Pulses
+
A clock
+
An oscillator
+
2 x Low Pass Gate

Random beatbox G audiooutput IN AUDIO OUTPUT lpg1 AUDIO IN CV LPG1 OUT lpg1:e->audiooutput:w lpg2 AUDIO IN CV LPG2 OUT lpg2:e->audiooutput:w oscillator OSCILLATOR SINE oscillator:e->lpg1:w radiomusic RESET START RADIO MUSIC OUT radiomusic:e->audiooutput:w turingmachine TURING MACHINE CV OUT NOISE PULSE 1 PULSE 1+2 PULSE 5 turingmachine:e->lpg1:w turingmachine:e->lpg2:w turingmachine:e->lpg2:w turingmachine:e->radiomusic:w turingmachine:e->radiomusic:w
  1. The Radio Music settings file should include: MUTE=0 (for a fast response) StartCVImmediate=1 (so CV changes immediately retrigger the sample without waiting for a reset pulse)
  2. Create a basic kick and snare pattern by patching the Oscillator (set low) and the Turing white noise output to the audio inputs on two LPGs, with the outputs going to your output mixer. Trigger the white noise with the 1 output on the Pulses expander, with the the 1+2 output going to the oscillator channel
  3. Adjust the oscillator frequency and the Turing Machine pattern until you have a rough groove
  4. Then, patch the Turing Machine CV output to the Radio Music START input, with the Radio Machine output going to your output mixer. Set the Turing Machine CV level control to about 9 o'clock.
  5. Choose a drum loop bank on the Radio Music and adjust Station and Start knobs until you get something good
  6. Extra Sauce: Run the output through a Music Thing Spring Reverb. Patch the 2+4 output into a Maths channel, or other envelope generator. Send that envelope to the CV control input, for random, looping, tempo-synced reverb depth changes. It's even more fun with non-drum samples

Ingredients:
Turing Machine
+
Vactrol Mix
+
Radio Music
+
Any VCO
+
Any Reverb
+
Any Delay

Vactrol Mix Feedback

G audiooutput LEFT RIGHT AUDIO OUTPUT delay IN DELAY OUT vactrolmix IN 1 IN 2 IN 3 IN 4 VACTROLMIX LEFT RIGHT delay:e->vactrolmix:w radiomusic RADIO MUSIC OUT radiomusic:e->vactrolmix:w springreverb IN SPRING REVERB OUT springreverb:e->vactrolmix:w vactrolmix:e->audiooutput:w vactrolmix:e->audiooutput:w vactrolmix:e->delay:w vactrolmix:e->springreverb:w vco VCO SINE vco:e->vactrolmix:w

  1. The Vactrol Mix gets really fun when you feed it back into itself.
  2. Start by patching any two audio sources into the top two channels.
  3. Patch one left and right output into any effects module - delays and reverbs are most obvious, but you could use a filter (crank up the resonance) or waveshaper.
  4. Patch the outputs from the effects modules back into channels 3 and 4.
  5. Now start playing with the levels. Every control is interactive; feedback will be infuenced by the audio input levels, the feedback return levels and perhaps most of all by the clock speed - it takes a while for feedback to build up, so slow clocks will create more squealing.
  6. This is what this patch sounds like.
Ingredients:
Graphic EQ
+
Mixer

Turbo Graphic Eq

G audiooutput IN AUDIO OUTPUT audiosource AUDIO SOURCE OUT mixer IN 1 IN 2 MIXER OUT audiosource:e->mixer:w graphiceq IN GRAPHIC EQ OUT graphiceq:e->audiooutput:w graphiceq:e->mixer:w mixer:e->graphiceq:w

  1. When all the faders on the Graphic EQ in the middle, the audio signal is inverted. If you mix this inverted signal with the original signal, the two signals are perfectly out of phase so cancel each other out. You'll get a little bit of bleed, because the linear potentiometers aren't perfect, but it's pretty good.
  2. If you push one of the faders up, you'll hear just that EQ band by itself - a much more extreme version of the normal Graphic EQ effect.
Ingredients:
Spring Reverb
+
Maths
+
VCA
+
VCO

Gated or Reverse Reverb

G audiooutput IN AUDIO OUTPUT maths TRIG L MATHS EOR 4 EOC maths:e->maths:w springreverb CV IN SPRING REVERB OUT maths:e->springreverb:w vca CV IN VCA OUT maths:e->vca:w springreverb:e->audiooutput:w vca:e->springreverb:w vco VCO SINE vco:e->vca:w

  1. Set up the right side of a Maths as an envelope controlling the VCA to create a string of short audio pulses / blips.
  2. Connect Maths EOC to the left side TRIG. Ensure left side is not in cycle mode.
  3. Connect the Maths Left output to the Spring CV input. Set the blend to 7 o’clock and Control to 5 o’clock. Listen to the spring reverb output.
  4. The Spring LED should now flash in time with the audio pulses. Left hand Rise control sets the length of the reverb.
  5. Switch the Spring CV input from EOR to the envelope out (1) to get pseudo-reverse reverb.
The diagrams on this page were generated using Spektro Audio's Patchbook software.